The Pictures In Our Heads

video

I’ve learned a lot recently about using Video Modelling with students to help them learn skills. The idea is that you repeatedly show kids videos of people engaging in the specific behavior that you want them to learn, and it increases the chances that they will choose that behaviour. I prefer creating these videos with students, having them star in their own video: demonstrating how to enter the school without pushing, putting up your hand and waiting to be called on in class, or asking for help in an assertive way. The results have been amazing, and the research is clear that this strategy is a solid one. (Plus, it’s a lot of fun to do!)

Through a Restitution lens, this makes perfect sense. We all carry pictures in our heads of the way we want the world to be, called our Quality World. We cannot create something in the world that we haven’t first created in our heads.

This is why people sometimes chose self-defeating behaviors. The aggressive student continues getting into fights no matter how many times he’s punished because he doesn’t have a picture of how to effectively stand up for himself in a non-violent way. The abused woman continues to choose partners who hurt her, because she doesn’t have a picture in her quality world of herself in a healthy relationship.

One of the problems with our traditional reward and consequence approach to behavior is that rewards and consequences don’t create those pictures that a person needs in order to try a new behavior.

What other strategies have you found that help kids to create better pictures?

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One thought on “The Pictures In Our Heads

  1. Josette Lukowycz says:

    I love the Video Modelling idea. This has probably been thought of but perhaps another version of this theme is to have students bring in pictures from magazines depicting a behaviour they feel is appropriate and admirable. They could also go through their family’s photo album to find a picture that depicts admirable modelling behaviours.

    Like

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